The Lindbergh Travel Trailer

The Lindbergh Travel Trailer is a remarkable piece of four-wheeled American memorabilia, there weren’t many Americans more famous than Charles Lindbergh in 1939 – he had only just returned from voluntary exile in Europe after the tragic kidnapping and murder of his infant son in 1932 that had ignited an American media frenzy.

Lindbergh’s personal travel trailer was built by an engineer of the Sir Francis Drake Hotel, he designed it with twin-axels so that it could be free-standing without requiring a jack or lift. The exterior is lightweight aluminium and the interior is all wood-panelled and is still in well-kept original condition.

If you’ve been looking for a unique caravan for your summer holidays and feel that the Airstream is just a little too commonplace, you’ll want to click here to visit its listing on Bonhams. Lindbergh’s Travel Trailer will be auctioned at the Quail Lodge Auction on the 15th of August 2014, and is currently estimated to be worth approximately $150,000 USD – which is remarkably reasonable considering its history and provenance.

 The Lindbergh Travel Trailer

 The Lindbergh Travel Trailer

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.410 Gauge Walking Stick Gun

There’s something undeniably dapper about a gentleman with a discreet walking stick gun – a tool originally designed as a defensive weapon against the street urchins and ruffians of the Victorian era. The vintage .410 gauge walking stick/shotgun you see above is an original, working example and is leather covered with a brass collar concealing the trigger, along with a brass muzzle and plug.

With an estimated value of ~$1,000 USD it’s not out of reach financially for most collectors, although it may be a little tough to explain to the Mrs why you just blew a grand on an old walking stick.

Click here to read more via Bonhams.

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1974 BMW 2002 Turbo

The BMW 2002 Turbo is a wonderful example of what can occur when serendipity happens to a couple of Germans who happen to work at BMW. You see, the BMW 2002 owes its existence to an afternoon in 1967 when Helmut Werner Bönsch (BMW’s director of product planning) and Alex von Falkenhausen (designer of the M10 engine) met in the BMW garage whilst getting their custom BMW 1600-2s serviced.

The two men realised that they’d both independently contracted engineers to install 2 litre engines in their lightweight 1600-2 coupes, creating a peppy little daily driver that they realised might have broader appeal. They joined forces and presented a proposal to the BMW board of directors to manufacture a 2 litre version of the little 1600-2, they received the official stamp of approval and by 1968, the new BMW 2002 was in full production.

The 2002 quickly became a popular race car, it won its class at the 1970 Nurburgring 24-hour and took 1st place in countless rallies, hill-climbs and amateur events. Even today over 40 years later, the little 2002 is still winning vintage races with ease.

By 1971 BMW decided to give the little car-that-could a new lease on life with a KKK turbocharger – increasing power from 100/120hp to 170hp, the only downside was that they introduced it just before the Oil Crisis which resulted in lower demand, so they only made 1,672 Turbos in total.

The 1974 BMW 2002 Turbo you see here has been fully reworked by Manofied Racing, possibly making it the quickest 2002 in the world. The full list of specifications is impressive, and a little frightening, it also happens to be for sale with a Buy It Now price of $42,500 USD.

Click here to visit the eBay listing.

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Asprey Pocket Knife & Game Counter

This ivory-handled Asprey pocket knife has a clever game counter and place finder built into its side – to ensure that the country gent can keep tabs on his afternoon’s shooting without losing count.

The knife itself contains one large blade and two smaller blades, a flat-head screwdriver, a wood-saw, a cartridge-extractor for 12 & 16-bore cartridges, a combination hoof-pick and file and a corkscrew.

On the handle, the ivory grip-scales with counters for ‘pheasants’, ‘partridges’, ‘grouse’, ‘various’, and ‘hundreds’ – And it’s all in perfect working order. Now all you need is the Holland & Holland and the English country estate.

Read more here.

 

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The 1992 Baja 1000

There’s about vintage Baja-style desert racing that is hugely appealing to me – the relative simplicity of the machinery and the fact that it largely comes down to the toughness of the driver to determine the winner is how I think all motor racing should be. I’m still convinced that we need a racing series that takes showroom-stock 4x4s out and races them across varied terrain to determine the winner, allowing us to cut through the marketing spin and see for ourselves just how capable each of them really is.

The 1992 Baja 1000 was the 25th running of the now infamous desert race, this documentary is 45 minutes long and gives a fantastic insight into the running of the race, all through the filter of VHS quality video.

If you’d like to read more about the Baja 100, you can visit the official website here.

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Marion Olive Boot by Helm Boots

Helm Boots is a small company that takes pride in making all of their wares in the United States using classic American made Horween Chromexcel leather, brass eyelets and Blake Rapid Stitch construction. The choice of olive green is unusual in a boot like this, but it works well with the white pinstripe across the sole and red laces (although the boot is offered with brown laces for the slightly less adventurous).

These are the kind of boots our grandfathers wore while they built the country, wooed our grandmothers and raised our parents. Properly cared for you can expect these boots to last well past the next return of Halley’s comet, they’ll slowly get better looking with age and patina, and you can expect them to get more comfortable with time, as the Horween leather moulds to there shape of your foot.

Grab yours here

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1951 BSA Star Twin Bonneville Racer

There’s something unusual about the salt flats at Bonneville, for some reason the sodium from this location in Utah inspires some of the most jaw-dropping amateur engineering on earth – the veterans call it “salt fever” and once you’ve got it, you’ve got it for life.

One such sufferer of salt fever is Dan Daughenbaugh, a remarkable man capable of backyard engineering at a world class level. His current project centres around a 1951 BSA Star Twin engine that he’s rebuilding and re-engineering into a world record capable salt flat racer.

Rather than dilute his words by retyping them, I’ve decided to format them and add them below, so you can read the story of how this bike came to be. A team of filmmakers has united behind Dan and they’re currently raising funds to create a documentary surrounding him and his BSA Star Twin called “A Line in the Salt”, if you’d like to see the trailer and kick in a few bucks to help, you can click here to visit the campaign on IndieGoGo.

“About the summer of 2011 I was beginning to toy with the idea of building a bike to race at Bonneville. I had been involved a little with other forms of motorcycle racing but never as a competitor. I had begun to assemble parts. The front frame loop I traded a guy a Harley wheel.

The bottom of the loop was rusted through the tubes. David Bird made the rear loop and I welded it up in my shop on a homemade frame-jig. The front end is a Honda CL350 that I machined the trees to fit the head tube. I had to machine an axle to use the spool wheel in the Honda fork legs. The suitable pre 1956 motor for the class I wanted to be in was found after a local shop had burnt to the ground.

A few days later they had a Fire Sale and there it was blackened and charred, all the pot metal parts had melted off but the cases were still good! The motor is a real mongrel inside. The stock crank had been know as a week link from when they were new and at the power levels I wanted to make would surely fail. I got to machining a later crank from a 70′s lightning in my garage to fit in the early cases.

With that done I wanted to use longer rods to lower piston speed and take advantage of less rod angularity. I settled on Carillio Triumph 650 units hat were 1/2 inch longer than original. These had to be narrowed .160 on the big end to fit the crank. Nothing like milling away on brand new $600 rods. With those fitted Im running Triumph trident pistons in STD size.

There is a .063 spacer under the barrel to keep the pistons from hitting the head Compression comes in at 13.6:1 and I run it on a Methanol/Nitromethane mix. The camshaft is a Harmon and Collins roller unit that was made in the 60′s, I have never seen another one. I made the pushrods out of aluminum and the valvetrain is a mix of modern ford V8 parts and Titanium pieces.

The rocker arms as well as many other internal parts have peen polished to reduce windage and stress risers. Since the race In Ohio I have rebuilt the top end, made a new stainless 2-1 exhaust, rebuilt the trans complete machining the trans case for better bearings and upgraded the wheel bearings. Im hoping with the new upgrades and additional room we will go well above the current 111mph record.”

Click here to visit the official A Line in the Salt website.

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A Twist of the Wrist: The Basics of High-Performance Motorcycle Riding

The original version of the book A Twist of the Wrist: The Basics of High-Performance Motorcycle Riding quickly entered the essential reading list of both veteran motorcyclists and those new to two-wheeled transportation – it’s a book I personally recommend to new motorcyclists, just because I’m convinced it’ll save their life.

Volume 2 of A Twist of the Wrist is an updated version of the original, it includes all the same essential advice along with a host of new information, tips and tricks. I’ll admit that the graphic design used on the book’s cover hasn’t dated well, in fact it’s dated terribly, but look past that at the advice offered by its author Keith Code and I think you’ll agree that it’s a vital read for anyone with even a passing interest in motorcycles.

Grab yours here

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1992 Vector W8 Twin Turbo

The Vector W8 Twin Turbo was first shown to the public in 1990, it totally electrified the global motoring press and provided the Americans with their own hypercar – to compete with the likes of Lamborghini, Ferrari and Porsche.

The Vector was an exceedingly advanced and suitably expensive motor car, it cost $448,000 USD (in 1990 dollars) new and was built to last at least as long as the life of the owner. Each Vector W8 was made from materials almost unheard of in road car production – carbon fibre and Kevlar were used extensively throughout which has led to the cars being almost entirely rust and corrosion proof.

Powered by a 625bhp 5973cc mid-mounted Donovan aluminium V8 engine with twin Garrett turbochargers and fuel injection, the Vector W8 was astonishingly fast and had an independently recorded top speed of 242 mph (389 kph) by Top Wheels magazine on the Bonneville Salt Flats.

Due to the exorbitant cost only 19 Vector W8s were made by the time production shut down, it’s thought that they all still exist but they very rarely come up for sale, and when they do they usually sell for prices in excess of 1.2 million USD. The W8 you see here is a low mileage, former museum example and is being offered in pristine condition at the Monterey Auction on the 15th of August 2014, I suspect that this car is going to set a new price record for a Vector W8 but only time will tell.

Click here to read more via RM Auctions.

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Photo Credits: Pawel Litwinski ©2014 Courtesy of RM Auctions

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The Trusco Toolbox

The Trusco Toolbox is an unusual thing to find outside of a Japanese garage, the company is legendary in its native country but almost unheard of internationally – something the team at Hand-Eye Supply have decided to rectify.

The solid steel construction coated in a thick blue enamel should ensure that this is a toolbox that’ll outlast most of your tools, inside it has 10 moveable upper level dividers for small items and it measures in at 13.5″ long x 6.5″ high x 6.25″ wide.

Grab yours here

Trusco Toolbox 2 The Trusco Toolbox

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